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The Era of the Technology Enabled DPO has Begun

Confucius once said ‘Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated.’ One can only imagine Confucius’ reaction to a roundtable with a DPO, CISO and CIO in 2018. ‘You connected what, why?’ ‘You understand this behaviour, how?’ ‘Robots are storing information, why, how and where?’

Staring bleary-eyed back at Confucius the tech leaders might retort, ‘We aren’t making it complicated, we are the ones managing complexity.’

Herein lies the reality for the technology leader in 2018; the advance of technology lies outside of our control, and like the frog in the boiling pot, the heat to protect critical data is starting to bubble, with little support for upgrading the more resistant capabilities of those who find themselves in the pot.

In a search for that extra protection, DPOs in particular are turning to technology, and here’s how.

The Era of the Technology Enabled DPO has Begun

The 2018 EY-International Association of Privacy (IAPP) study showed that 56% of businesses believe they are not entirely GDPR compliant with 20% of businesses believing full compliance is impossible.

To understand how DPOs are turning to technology to close the compliance gap, let’s look at how spending on data privacy/GDPR compliance has changed over the past few years.

The EY-IAPP report has a few telling statistics in this regard:

  • Amongst companies preparing for GDPR 57% are investing in technology in 2018, up from 27% in 2016.
  • 68% of programme leaders now say data inventory and mapping is a priority, up from 48% in 2016.
  • IT and Information Security are now responsible for housing 30% of GDPR/information governance programmes up from 14% in 2016.
  • Right to Be Forgotten and Subject Access Requests were voted the two most difficult GDPR obligations to fulfil. Both currently rely on manual data discovery processes across multiple applications and platforms.

The observed compliance gap, alongside the shift away from human-resource spending to technology spending, suggests that the problem of data discovery, compliance and security is one whose solution supersedes the capabilities of even the best-intentioned human resources.

At the same time the number of DPOs are on the rise, with DPO vacancies up a staggering 700% from 2 years ago.

We can learn two things from this:

  • Data Protection Officers are turning to technology to help discover and protect data
  • Despite the increase in technology uptake, the human role of directing technology is more important and involved than ever.

And so the era of the technology enabled DPO has begun. Fortunately, technology for DPOs seeks for the most part to automate manual process, making the marriage between humans and tech in data protection truly Cyborgian in nature.

This marriage should seem intuitive as the first role of any newly appointed DPO is to answer, ‘What data do I have? Where is it? Who has access to it? How is it secured?’. It’s unrealistic for Data Protection Officers to be literally hands-on with data in 2018 hence smart data discovery and control tools coming to the fore.

So what technology solutions can help?

Data discovery and compliance technologies like Exonar in the UK have emerged in the past 18 months with plug in and play solutions for automated enterprise data discovery where previously none existed. The solutions discover data automatically to create accurate, real-time, classified inventories of information that allow DPOs to see a full breakdown of data and its sensitivity across an organisation, enabling DPOs to govern and protect data effectively.

Through the marriage of DPOs and data discovery technologies, data protection programmes can instantly become much more achievable, accurate, and less work for those involved. The era of the technology enabled DPO has begun.

https://iapp.org/media/pdf/resource_center/IAPP_EY_Gov_Report_2018.pdf

John Tsopanis
Data and Privacy Director, Exonar

Exonar has the SARlution to Subject Access Requests

Newbury, UK, November 2018: Exonar has launched a new website to showcase its Case Management Module that can dramatically decrease the time and cost involved in processing Subject Access Requests (SARs).

SARlution demonstrates an easy way to deal with SARs by using Exonar’s platform to find all the necessary personal data digitally, understand how that data is processed and stored and create simple templates to complete SAR cases. The graphical dashboard shows how many SARs have been processed and how many are waiting to be processed and tracks the time to completion.

SARs can be expensive and disruptive to an organisation. To address this Exonar’s platform maintains an up-to-date index of all information. It uses machine learning to understand customer data in emails, databases, word documents and spreadsheets. It’s automated and intuitive, enabling rapid data collation to reduce the time required for processing SARs.

As an example of the complexity involved with completing requests, when an Exonar employee submitted a SAR to their bank – with whom they have been a customer for over 10 years – they received around 800 sheets in 15 reims of paper.

Adrian Barrett, CEO and founder of Exonar, said: “SARs can contain a huge amount of information, often filling two or more courier shipping boxes. Finding, collating and redacting all of this information can hit organisations hard in terms of both cost and time to complete. But the latest technology can dramatically reduce the complexity of dealing with requests, driving down the time required to complete requests from days to minutes.”

SARs and GDPR

SARs were first introduced by the 1998 Digital Protection Act. But since the introduction of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May 2018, the time that organisations have to complete requests has been cut from 40 days (as per the 1998 DPA) to one month. Organisations must also complete requests free of charge in most cases.

Failure to comply with requests or meet deadlines can expose organisations to new enforcement measures wielded by the UK’s Information Commissioner under the GDPR, including large fines.

But faced with these changes, many organisations will struggle to complete SARs due to the many systems, departments, processes, people and business units often involved when fulfilling a SAR. Exonar spoke to a previous SARs processor within the NHS about the challenges faced when dealing with Subject Access Requests in an under-resourced environment. Read the full article here: exo.nr/SARsNHS

The cost of compliance

The new guidelines present significant challenges to organisations that rely on old processes. For example, Exonar’s recent Freedom of Information research into how the public sector deals with SARs found that the average cost of processing a request is £145.46, but in some cases the cost was much higher such was the complexity of finding data and the associated administration.

The research also found that many organisations failed to meet the deadline for providing answers to its FOI requests (requests must be completed within 20 working days). The average response time was 24 days, highlighting the difficulty that many will face complying with requests under the new GDPR requirements.

Exonar’s platform solves these issues by discovering and offering instant visibility of sensitive data so organisations can complete SARs quickly, as well as improving risk management and cyber security.

Barrett concluded: “Exonar’s case management module offers a simple dashboard with a complete overview of SAR cases including detailed reporting and insight into bottlenecks. Easy to create templates allow untrained users to instantly find information related to an individual, and documents can be easily reviewed without the need to access the originals. It makes SAR processing simple and painless allowing the business to free up valuable personnel to focus on the business.”

About Exonar

Exonar solves a problem common to all organisations and their senior information owners, “I just don’t know what I’ve got”. Exonar finds and fixes an organisations’ information, from databases to documents – swiftly and at scale. We use machine learning to understand what’s important, where it is and who has access to it.

Exonar identifies documents containing passwords, customer and confidential information enabling successful governance, risk management, document retention, cyber security and compliance with regulations such as GDPR and CCPA – with ease.

We enable organisations to better organise their information, removing risk and making it more productive and secure. Visit us at sarlution.com to learn how your SAR process can made quicker, easier and much more cost effective.

GDPR Myths: The five most common myths

GDPR Myths: It was inevitable that once GDPR had made its grand entrance on May 25th, hearsay, speculation and scaremongering was going to dominate the headlines. Some of those stories are still circulating, however – NatWest have published an article that puts to bed 5 common myths around GDPR that all SME business owners should get clued up on.

This informative article also features a comment from our COO Julie Evans, speaking about the importance of data security in line with the new regulations.

Read More: exo.nr/GDPRmyths

 

GDPR is here and now there’s the CCPA too! Exonar Latest News

GDPR, CCPA, POPI – TMI?
Living with new privacy laws

What We’ve Been Reading And Writing This Month   

GDPR is here and now there’s the CCPA too!
Plus – We’re Hiring & ‘Ain’t got no Privacy’ – 80’s privacy issues!

New Exonar research released July 4th 2018, shows that public sector organisations face increased financial pressure as a result of the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), to the tune of £30million per year.
The NHS is expected to be hit hardest by the influx in data requests, given that before the introduction it cost the NHS £20.6million per year to retrieve customer data.
Rise appears to reflect more stringent reporting obligations under EU’s new data protection regime. More than 1,100 reports of data breaches involving people’s personal information have been received by the Data Protection Commission in the two months since a new EU legal regime came into force.
How the GDPR will disrupt Google and Facebook
New laws and high profile investigations have helped put data protection and privacy at the centre of the UK public’s consciousness like never before, the Information Commissioner has said.
Exonar simplifies compliance with the California Consumer Privacy Act by getting right to the heart of the matter: Finding, Mapping and Managing your data.
Plantatreeforprivacy: the impact of GDPR when privacy regulations change
In this Privacy Tracker series, we look at laws from across the globe and match them up against the EU General Data Protection Regulation. The aim is to help you determine how much duplication of operational effort you might avoid as you work toward compliance and help you focus your efforts. In …
Get our free GDPR report
The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (aka CaCPA) creates unprecedented obligations for companies that do business in California (the world’s fifth largest economy) or collect the personal information of California’s 40 million residents.
We Are Hiring - Marketing Executive - Exonar
Are you our next Marketing Manager? An exciting startup software business, we’re looking for an ambitious marketer to take responsibility for creating and delivering our marketing strategy. A British software company, we have just raised significant funding to boost our growth strategy through 2018.
Plantatreeforprivacy: the impact of GDPR when privacy regulations change
Music video by Rockwell performing Somebody’s Watching Me. (C) 2004 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

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The Great Data Shake Up – GDPR changes at 100 days and counting

The 5 Key GDPR Changes at 100 days and counting

September 2nd marked 100 days since the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into force. The new rules marked a much-needed update to the UK’s aging 1998 Data Protection Act.

The update had been a long time coming. So what have we learned so far? Here’s five ways that GDPR has shaken up the way we gather, store and process data.

1. Effective data management starts with discovery

With the amount of data collected and stored by organisations large and small, data discovery has played a major role in achieving GDPR compliance.

What’s more, being able to react to changes in user habits and trends, like permanently deleting social media accounts or customer history and interactions, has added complications to data management that must be addressed.

Advances in technology, like Big Data and Machine Learning, have added a level of simplicity to creating a data inventory. When implemented correctly, these principles can be used as part of an eDiscovery and data mapping process with the ability to rapidly find and categorise data and to do so on an on-going basis – ensuring continual compliance for an organisation rather than just at a single point in time.

The added benefit of a digital discovery process is that unknown data is often identified and located. It’s vital that all data is accounted for to ensure compliance. After all, you don’t know what you don’t know.

2. The price of non-compliance

Failure to comply with the GDPR can lead to heavier punishments than ever before. Fines for malpractice have increased from a maximum of £500,000 up to €20 million, or 4% of annual turnover (whichever is higher).

What’s more, individuals can sue a business for compensation to recover both material damage and non-material damage, like distress.

Article 82 of the GDPR states that any person who suffered material or non-material damage as a result of an infringement of the GDPR has the right to receive compensation from the data controller or processor for the damage suffered.

Therefore, it’s possible that compensation claims could reach huge numbers if a breach occurs on a large scale under the new rules, increasing financial losses as well as consuming vast amounts of time dealing with individual litigation. Just consider the recent British Airways data breach, where BA revealed that 380,000 customer transactions had been compromised. As well as potentially facing an enourmous fine under GDPR, it may be the case that every customer will be eligible for compensation.

3. Dealing with SARs

Subject Access Requests (SARs) are not a new component of the GDPR, they were first introduced under the 1998 DPA. However, GDPR has made several changes to the way that SARs (or a Right of Access as they are known under GDPR) operate which organisations must be aware of.

To begin with, organisations can no longer charge for producing SARs, and they have less time to complete them (one month, instead of 40 days).

Exonar’s own research found that many organisations struggled to meet the deadline for providing answers to FOI requests (FOI requests must be completed within 20 working days), highlighting the difficulty that many will face complying with requests under the new GDPR requirements.

The time taken by public sector organisations to respond to an FOI varied from one day to 159 days. On average it took 24 days, with the NHS averaging 27, emergency services 21, central government 22 and local government 23 days.

In another survey Exonar carried out before GDPR came into force, 57% of individuals said they would want to request their data as there is now no cost. This means organisations need to ensure they are prepared for a significant increase in the number of requests they handle.

They also need to ensure they are giving users the data they are expecting. For example, Spotify users recently noticed that although they have access to data download tools, to get hold of all of the data held – such as telemetry or A/B testing – a SAR needed to be sent to Spotify’s privacy team.

But the latest technology can help. Platforms are available that can map and understand any information held and create an index which can then be searched in seconds, no matter how much data is held. This greatly reduces the time and cost of managing data and compliance, and in fact it can reduce the cost of processing a SAR to zero.

4. Understand your data

Achieving compliance with the principles of GDPR is an ongoing task, but it becomes a simple one with added benefits once you understand the data you hold and how it’s processed. A completed audit shouldn’t mean you then stand still. Data should be continually reviewed to better organise and refine management processes.

Removing risk, especially if it’s data that has no value, is vital. When you understand your data, it makes it much easier to identify and act on duplicate, obsolete or redundant data and therefore minimise storing and processing costs.

The latest tools are able to search your sensitive information and index files in any format, no matter where the data is held, such as mail servers or the cloud. This means locating and understanding information like passwords, credit card details and confidential records is simple.

5. Beyond GDPR

Although it applies mainly to data processing, the effects of GDPR are far reaching and a successful programme of compliance often brings additional benefits, such as improvements in efficiency and productivity, tighter cyber security and increased customer loyalty and trust.

Of course, in a perfect world, data would already be stored securely and processes would be in place to ensure continued compliance.

But the good news for any businesses concerned about GDPR compliance and surviving the next 100 days is that the tools mentioned above are all available today. And not only will they help you become compliant, but they will ensure you remain compliant and in control of your data.

Adrian Barrett, CEO and founder, Exonar

To find out more about the tools that can help you to discover and understand your data, visit exonar.com. For specific help with SARs, see sarlution.com.

Making the Digital Pledge work – ITProPortal

Adrian Barrett, CEO, Exonar

Local Government Minister Rishi Sunak recently launched a ‘digital pledge’ for local authorities and a £7.5 million fund to help them transform their online services. It’s an interesting move and one I hope will unlock innovation as intended.

Local councils are under such pressure to save money that an investment like this could kick start some fresh thinking and new approaches to solving problems that plague budgets. However, signing a declaration to say that your council will apply digital technology to problem solving is one thing, making technology really work hard for you is another.

exo.nr/DigitalPledge

The Impact of Privacy on the Public Sector

Data Requests Under GDPR to Push Cost to Public Sector Past £30 million

  • Annual costs to complete requests for personal data reach £20.6m for NHS and £7.9m for local government
  • £2.1m gap will emerge as organisations can no longer charge a fee to complete requests
  • Some 30million requests are expected across public and private sector this coming year, which will cost UK PLC £4.5bn

Newbury, UK, 4 July 2018: New research released today shows that public sector organisations face increased financial pressure as a result of the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), to the tune of £30million per year. The NHS is expected to be hit hardest by the influx in data requests, given that before the introduction it cost the NHS £20.6million per year to retrieve customer data.

The impact of GDPR doesn’t stop there. Further new guidelines ruling that in most cases an organisation must also complete requests free of charge are an extra blow to budgets. This marks a key change from previous guidelines under the 1998 Data Protection Act (DPA), which allowed a processing fee to be charged. As such, a £2.1m gap in income per year is expected to emerge.

The detail behind the numbers:

The figures are the result of an extensive Freedom of Information (FOI) Act request made by Exonar, a leading provider of GDPR data mapping and data inventory solutions, to 458 organisations, including NHS Trusts (206), local government (125), central government (61) and emergency services (66) from across the UK.

The FOIs asked for the number of subject access requests (SARs) received by the organisation in 2014, 2015, and 2016* and the cost of processing each SAR.

On average, a SAR cost £145.46 to process, though some bodies admitted it costs much more, sometimes running as high as £1,800 such was the complexity of finding data and the associated administration. Multiplying the average cost to complete a SAR with the number of SARs received by the respondents in 2016 (209,023), results in a total administration cost to the public sector of £30.4 million.

Each organisation could previously have recouped some of the cost and charged a recommended £10 fee to complete a SAR but under GDPR they will no longer be able to, resulting in a £2.1m deficit that is set to grow wider as more requests are made.

NHS will be hit hardest

The study found that on average each NHS Trust already receives 800 requests per year. Multiplying this by the average cost of processing SARs and then by the 241 Trusts in the UK, the total cost to the NHS of managing SARs stands at £20.6million annually. It’s expected this will only go up as more people become aware of their rights.

In general, the public sector will struggle to meet SAR response deadlines

The GDPR has trimmed the amount of time that organisations have to complete SAR requests from 40 days – as per the 1998 DPA – to one month.

Exonar’s research found that many organisations struggled to meet the deadline for providing answers to its FOI requests (requests must be completed within 20 working days), highlighting the difficulty that many will face complying with requests under the new GDPR requirements.

The time to respond to an FOI varied from one day to 159 days. On average it took 24 days, with the NHS averaging 27, emergency services 21, central government 22 and local government 23 days.

Some Trusts can’t put a figure on the cost of processing a SAR

Some NHS Trusts declined to provide a figure such was the complexity of finding all the data related to a person. One such Trust was Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust, which though couldn’t provide a figure, highlighted that the costs would include 3 WTE band 2 staff (approx. £16,500 pa each), plus costs such as discs costing £1,044/year, envelopes with an annual cost of £40, and postage costs at £1.48 per patient.

The Trust added that this would be a minimum cost and there are other costs that “cannot be quantified”, such as involvement of management, clinicians, physio and health visitors, finance and even X-ray costs.

Adrian Barrett, CEO and founder of Exonar, said that the variance in time taken to respond demonstrates how complex a task SARs are in the public sector: “The good news is the public sector is taking its responsibility to do a thorough job and find all the data pertaining to a person seriously. However, there’s a heavy process burden, especially when multiple bodies are involved, and the NHS in particular needs an alternative to manpower to trace data if it is to avoid penalties of non-compliance.”

Adrian adds that digital initiatives in the public sector have to be accelerated to relieve the burden on the public purse: “Our estimates on the costs of managing SARs is probably conservative but we do expect an immediate bow wave in response to all the GDPR emails we saw in May and June.

“Because the public now knows about the GDPR they are more likely to raise more SARs, and if there is a sudden wave of requests the public sector will be stretched further. It’s clear that the government needs to take advantage of new technology, particularly artificial intelligence, to help the public sector become more efficient with handling, organising and retrieving its data.”

Local government also hit hard to tune of £7.9million

For local government the cost of managing a SAR stands at £596. With each council receiving around 138 SARs annually, the 418 local government bodies across the UK could expect to see total costs of £7.9million/ year. This number is expected to rise given that between 2014 and 2016 the number of SARs jumped from 15,173 to 17,274.

It’s estimated by Exonar that an average SAR will run to thousands of pages as complete medical histories and the like are produced. It’s a reflection of the situation in the private sector, where a bank provided 2 boxes of paper for a single customer who had banked with them for 25 years.**

Barrett says the total number of SARs could cost UK PLC billions: “We expect 30 million requests to be made this year to private businesses of all sizes and the public sector. If we assume the cost to process a SAR is the same in public and private sectors, then the cost to UK PLC stands at £4.5bn. That’s an extraordinary sum to set against admin that has no value to a company.”

A copy of the full report, which details all the findings and compares NHS, Emergency services, local and central government can be requested here.

Notes to editors
*complete data for 2017 was not available
** A limited scope SAR submitted to a high street bank that a customer had been with for over 20 years generated over 800 sheets paper, enough to fill two DHL boxes. An image showing the results is here.
Additional research related to how the public will react to their new-found data rights is here. It highlights that 57% of UK adults would raise a SAR on companies and public sector organisations once GDPR was explained to them.

About the research
458 public sector organisations responded to FOI requests between September and November 2017. The FOI asked for number of SARs received between 2014-2016 and the cost to complete a SAR. 206 NHS Trusts, 125 local government, 61 central government and 66 emergency services from across the UK completed the request.
Numbers have been calculated by averaging the figures provided by the different sectors to provide sector comparisons in particular for the NHS and local government. There are 418 local government bodies, and 241 NHS Trusts.

About Exonar
Exonar solves a problem common to all organisations and their senior information owners, “I just don’t know what I’ve got”. Exonar finds and fixes an organisations’ information, from databases to documents – instantly and at scale. We use machine learning to understand what’s important, where it is and who has access to it.
Exonar identifies documents containing passwords, customer and confidential information enabling successful governance, risk management, document retention, cyber security and compliance with forthcoming regulations such as GDPR – with ease.
We enable organisations to better organise their information, removing risk and making it more productive and secure. Visit us at exonar.com or follow us @Exonar.

 

Can you handle the Sauce Ex Challenge? Infosecurity Europe

5 Questions – 5 Crackers – 5 Litres of HOT SAUCE!

See us on stand R145, Infosecurity Europe 2018 – Olympia, London, 5-7 June 2018

Choose either Ghost GDPepR ‘Sauce Ex’ (1m scovilles) or ‘Regret’ (12m scovilles) and test your GDPR knowledge in the hottest competition at Infosecurity Europe, 2018.

GDPR is ‘the’ hot topic so we thought we’d spice things up and test your knowledge of the new legislation… whilst tasting some of the hottest chilli sauce available to liven it up!

Come and visit Exonar on Stand R145. If you’re clued up enough on the hotspots of GDPR, you’ll get a chance to enjoy our hot new release. No, not a new Exonar platform feature – our very own Sauce EX.

We like our spice down in Newbury – or ‘Silicon Canal’ as we like to call it – and Sauce EX is our homage to the superlatives of the Scoville Scale and the devilry of data management. A fiery, wickedly delicious and limited edition creation made from ultra-lively habanero and ghost chillies, it’s available exclusively and only to Infosecurity Europe visitors. Answer all five questions correctly in the fastest time without reaching for the milk and you’ll win your own 5 litre bottle of Sauce EX that’ll add some serious extra heat to your BBQs this summer.

So, if you think you’ve got the ‘fright’ stuff, pop down to Stand R145 and take your taste buds on an adventure they won’t forget. Remember: you can’t delegate this one to the DPO – they’ve already got some hot stuff on their plate.

Exonar CEO, Adrian Barrett and Business Development Director, Sean Campbell took the challenge without the need for any milk!

For further information, please contact: tellmemore@exonar.com
#sauceex

 

Infosecurity Europe 2018 – Olympia, London, 5-7 June 2018

See us on stand R145

Find & Fix your data: GDPR compliance and data management just got easier with updates to Exonar’s innovative Information IntelligenceTM platform

Exonar solves GDPR data mapping, data subject rights, and information security challenges – and now adds three new solution areas to make the DPO’s life easier

Olympia, London, 5 June 2018: UK data discovery specialists Exonar Ltd today unveiled powerful new updates to help organisations find and fix the data that they hold, whilst complying with new regulations such as the General Data Protection Regulation. The Exonar platform delivers the most comprehensive search capability to identify and understand all types of sensitive information. Providing instant search results across all information from databases, documents, email and file shares – from global dashboards right down to document level the powerful platform is a must for data discovery and ongoing management.

Whether stored in the cloud, on mail servers, in databases or in file sharing systems, personal data can rapidly become a liability, vulnerable to exploitation by hackers, criminals or other unauthorised third parties. From customer contact and private employee information to financial data, passwords, encryption keys and other confidential records, Exonar discovers and remediates the unstructured ‘digital litter’ scattered around your networks and devices.

So what’s new for Infosecurity Europe?

 

  • Auto classification: by understanding the content and intent of documents the Exonar platform is able to find and, using machine learning, automatically categorise groups of same or similar documents to enable rapid implementation of discovery, GDPR rights, document retention and information security policies.
  • OCR: Exonar adds optical character recognition to read any text stored in document scans, individual images, those embedded in documents or attached to an email enabling organisations with scanned document stores to bring these into their GDPR and data management strategies.
  • API: the new application programming interface allows easy third party integration with the Exonar platform automating discovery capabilities for a wide range of business processes and applications such as SIEM and DLP to augment these solutions with near-real time, Information IntelligenceTM. This non rules based approach makes DLP systems usable in the changing world of information governance.

With an easy-to-use dashboard, Exonar simplifies data discovery and management across four key areas of business operation:

  • GDPR: enables quick and pain-free discovery, mapping and remediation of personal data inventories under the new regulation.
  • Data Subject Rights: case management module enables fast and cost-effective handling and monitoring of data subject rights that form the core of the GDPR – providing an automated and efficient solution to the anticipated high volumes of data subject rights requests.
  • Information Security: plug into file shares, shared drives, mail servers, databases and cloud storage systems to provide the widest view of unstructured data so organisations can find and understand that data – and then protect it.
  • Cloud Governance: enables organisations to cleanse, migrate, monitor and control cloud storage for secure, simplified and risk-optimised access to the information they need.

Adrian Barrett, CEO and founder of Exonar, said:

“An exponential increase in data volume means organisations must find new ways to understand the risk as well as the opportunities in their data. Organisations who manage and use the data they hold effectively will survive and thrive in this privacy generation.

Our platform provides an instant picture of all the data that you hold, showing you what personal data you have and where it is – all in near real-time. We then enable you to control, change, manage, remediate, harmonise and secure that data in a prompt, cost-effective and compliant way, minimising risk of breach, leak or loss and optimising your relationship with your customer.

We help to bring order to the chaos that unstructured data can create and we’re confident that life with Exonar will also create efficiency and trust for both customers and employees” finished Barrett.

For further information, please contact: tellmemore@exonar.com

 

 

GDPR – Hit the Deadline with a Smile! Exonar Latest News

GDPR – Hit the Deadline with a Smile!

What We’ve Been Reading And Writing This Month

GDPR Guidance and Gags!
Plus – We’re Hiring… and Songs to make you smile!

Welcome to Simplifying GDPR from Exonar. What’s in our series of guides? Private sector, public sector or third sector, GDPR applies to all of us and the personal data we hold. Our four-part guide will explain how to approach GDPR – how to align the right technology, people and processes so that GDPR works for you and not vice versa.
Insights from PwC’s third General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) pulse survey.
European Supervisory Authorities have shed light on their initial enforcement priorities. Take a look at this IAPP infographic to learn more about where to focus your efforts to be on the right side of regulators. Click image to download pdf (1.63MB)
Ask the founder: 15 questions with NatWest
NatWest meets Exonar CEO – Adrian Barrett
In our series of interviews with SME founders about their business journey so far, we speak to Adrian Barrett, CEO and founder of data science company Exonar.
Businessman wins legal action to force removal of search results about past conviction
Key Responsibilities Working within the small engineering team you will be a seasoned (Java) Developer responsible for all aspects of day-to-day development; from developing new features, improving performance of our machine-learning components, to mentoring junior developers and engaging with…
Without wishing to dismiss GDPR as a bit of a joke, we think it’s time to lighten the mood around the new legislation. Submit yours @Exonar using #GDPRgags.
The Utterly Unrelated Section: Top 100 songs to make you smile!
With all this GDPR talk and May 25th looming ever closer, we accept that a few jokes might not be enough to relieve the pressure. So as you work through your plan and prioritise, here are a few tunes to help you through with a smile on your face – Hey Ya!