GDPR is here and now there’s the CCPA too! Exonar Latest News

GDPR, CCPA, POPI – TMI?
Living with new privacy laws

What We’ve Been Reading And Writing This Month   

GDPR is here and now there’s the CCPA too!
Plus – We’re Hiring & ‘Ain’t got no Privacy’ – 80’s privacy issues!

New Exonar research released July 4th 2018, shows that public sector organisations face increased financial pressure as a result of the recently implemented General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), to the tune of £30million per year.
The NHS is expected to be hit hardest by the influx in data requests, given that before the introduction it cost the NHS £20.6million per year to retrieve customer data.
Rise appears to reflect more stringent reporting obligations under EU’s new data protection regime. More than 1,100 reports of data breaches involving people’s personal information have been received by the Data Protection Commission in the two months since a new EU legal regime came into force.
How the GDPR will disrupt Google and Facebook
New laws and high profile investigations have helped put data protection and privacy at the centre of the UK public’s consciousness like never before, the Information Commissioner has said.
Exonar simplifies compliance with the California Consumer Privacy Act by getting right to the heart of the matter: Finding, Mapping and Managing your data.
Plantatreeforprivacy: the impact of GDPR when privacy regulations change
In this Privacy Tracker series, we look at laws from across the globe and match them up against the EU General Data Protection Regulation. The aim is to help you determine how much duplication of operational effort you might avoid as you work toward compliance and help you focus your efforts. In …
Get our free GDPR report
The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (aka CaCPA) creates unprecedented obligations for companies that do business in California (the world’s fifth largest economy) or collect the personal information of California’s 40 million residents.
We Are Hiring - Marketing Executive - Exonar
Are you our next Marketing Manager? An exciting startup software business, we’re looking for an ambitious marketer to take responsibility for creating and delivering our marketing strategy. A British software company, we have just raised significant funding to boost our growth strategy through 2018.
Plantatreeforprivacy: the impact of GDPR when privacy regulations change
Music video by Rockwell performing Somebody’s Watching Me. (C) 2004 Motown Records, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.

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The Great Data Shake Up – GDPR changes at 100 days and counting

The 5 Key GDPR Changes at 100 days and counting

September 2nd marked 100 days since the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into force. The new rules marked a much-needed update to the UK’s aging 1998 Data Protection Act.

The update had been a long time coming. So what have we learned so far? Here’s five ways that GDPR has shaken up the way we gather, store and process data.

1. Effective data management starts with discovery

With the amount of data collected and stored by organisations large and small, data discovery has played a major role in achieving GDPR compliance.

What’s more, being able to react to changes in user habits and trends, like permanently deleting social media accounts or customer history and interactions, has added complications to data management that must be addressed.

Advances in technology, like Big Data and Machine Learning, have added a level of simplicity to creating a data inventory. When implemented correctly, these principles can be used as part of an eDiscovery and data mapping process with the ability to rapidly find and categorise data and to do so on an on-going basis – ensuring continual compliance for an organisation rather than just at a single point in time.

The added benefit of a digital discovery process is that unknown data is often identified and located. It’s vital that all data is accounted for to ensure compliance. After all, you don’t know what you don’t know.

2. The price of non-compliance

Failure to comply with the GDPR can lead to heavier punishments than ever before. Fines for malpractice have increased from a maximum of £500,000 up to €20 million, or 4% of annual turnover (whichever is higher).

What’s more, individuals can sue a business for compensation to recover both material damage and non-material damage, like distress.

Article 82 of the GDPR states that any person who suffered material or non-material damage as a result of an infringement of the GDPR has the right to receive compensation from the data controller or processor for the damage suffered.

Therefore, it’s possible that compensation claims could reach huge numbers if a breach occurs on a large scale under the new rules, increasing financial losses as well as consuming vast amounts of time dealing with individual litigation. Just consider the recent British Airways data breach, where BA revealed that 380,000 customer transactions had been compromised. As well as potentially facing an enourmous fine under GDPR, it may be the case that every customer will be eligible for compensation.

3. Dealing with SARs

Subject Access Requests (SARs) are not a new component of the GDPR, they were first introduced under the 1998 DPA. However, GDPR has made several changes to the way that SARs (or a Right of Access as they are known under GDPR) operate which organisations must be aware of.

To begin with, organisations can no longer charge for producing SARs, and they have less time to complete them (one month, instead of 40 days).

Exonar’s own research found that many organisations struggled to meet the deadline for providing answers to FOI requests (FOI requests must be completed within 20 working days), highlighting the difficulty that many will face complying with requests under the new GDPR requirements.

The time taken by public sector organisations to respond to an FOI varied from one day to 159 days. On average it took 24 days, with the NHS averaging 27, emergency services 21, central government 22 and local government 23 days.

In another survey Exonar carried out before GDPR came into force, 57% of individuals said they would want to request their data as there is now no cost. This means organisations need to ensure they are prepared for a significant increase in the number of requests they handle.

They also need to ensure they are giving users the data they are expecting. For example, Spotify users recently noticed that although they have access to data download tools, to get hold of all of the data held – such as telemetry or A/B testing – a SAR needed to be sent to Spotify’s privacy team.

But the latest technology can help. Platforms are available that can map and understand any information held and create an index which can then be searched in seconds, no matter how much data is held. This greatly reduces the time and cost of managing data and compliance, and in fact it can reduce the cost of processing a SAR to zero.

4. Understand your data

Achieving compliance with the principles of GDPR is an ongoing task, but it becomes a simple one with added benefits once you understand the data you hold and how it’s processed. A completed audit shouldn’t mean you then stand still. Data should be continually reviewed to better organise and refine management processes.

Removing risk, especially if it’s data that has no value, is vital. When you understand your data, it makes it much easier to identify and act on duplicate, obsolete or redundant data and therefore minimise storing and processing costs.

The latest tools are able to search your sensitive information and index files in any format, no matter where the data is held, such as mail servers or the cloud. This means locating and understanding information like passwords, credit card details and confidential records is simple.

5. Beyond GDPR

Although it applies mainly to data processing, the effects of GDPR are far reaching and a successful programme of compliance often brings additional benefits, such as improvements in efficiency and productivity, tighter cyber security and increased customer loyalty and trust.

Of course, in a perfect world, data would already be stored securely and processes would be in place to ensure continued compliance.

But the good news for any businesses concerned about GDPR compliance and surviving the next 100 days is that the tools mentioned above are all available today. And not only will they help you become compliant, but they will ensure you remain compliant and in control of your data.

Adrian Barrett, CEO and founder, Exonar

To find out more about the tools that can help you to discover and understand your data, visit exonar.com. For specific help with SARs, see sarlution.com.

Making the Digital Pledge work – ITProPortal

Adrian Barrett, CEO, Exonar

Local Government Minister Rishi Sunak recently launched a ‘digital pledge’ for local authorities and a £7.5 million fund to help them transform their online services. It’s an interesting move and one I hope will unlock innovation as intended.

Local councils are under such pressure to save money that an investment like this could kick start some fresh thinking and new approaches to solving problems that plague budgets. However, signing a declaration to say that your council will apply digital technology to problem solving is one thing, making technology really work hard for you is another.

exo.nr/DigitalPledge